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Backdating options steve jobs

backdating options steve jobs-17

One of those two may be former CFO Fred Anderson, who served from 1996 to 2004, and whose resignation from Apple's Board of Directors was announced today.

Corporations, however, have defended the practice of stock option backdating with their legal right to issue options that are already in the money as they see fit, as well as the frequent occurrence in which a lengthy approval process is required.Numerous financial analysts replicated and expanded upon the prior academic research, developing lists of companies whose stock price performance immediately after options grants to senior management (the purported dates of which can be ascertained by inspecting a company's Form 4 filings, generally available online at the SEC's website) was suspicious.For instance, public companies generally grant stock options in accordance with a formal stock option plan approved by shareholders at an annual meeting.In the modern business world, the Sarbanes-Oxley Act has all but eliminated fraudulent options backdating by requiring companies to report all options issuances within 2 days of the date of issue.Options backdating may still occur under the new reporting regulations, but Sarbanes-Oxley compliant backdating is far less likely to be used for dishonest reasons due to the short time frame that is allowed for reporting.Apple has turned over its findings to the SEC, including those covering the the two unnamed former officers whose actions "raised serious concerns." There is also a chance that the stock options problem could result in Jobs' exit from the company, but many observers believe that is unlikely, as it would not be in the best interest of either Apple or its shareholders.

Options backdating is the practice of altering the date a stock option was granted, to a usually earlier (but sometimes later) date at which the underlying stock price was lower.

As a result, numerous companies are conducting internal investigations to determine if, when, and how backdating occurred, and are filing amended earnings statements and tax forms to show the issuance of “in the money” options in place of the “at the money” options that were previously reported.

This is not always the case, according to a ruling by federal judge William Alsup of the U. District Court for the Northern District of California.

When company executives discovered that they had the ability to backdate stock option grants, thus making them both tax deductible and “in the money” on the date of actual issuance, the common practice of stock option backdating for financial gain began on a widespread level.

The problem with this practice, according to the SEC, was that stock option backdating, while difficult to prove, could be considered a criminal act.

In 1972, a new revision (APB 25) in accounting rules resulted in the ability of any company to avoid having to report executive incomes as an expense to their shareholders if the income resulted from an issuance of “at the money” stock options.